Legal Drama

INTERN SUES Diddy’s Bad Boy Entertainment for Making her Get Coffee

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I don’t know if I have discussed intern lawsuits here on AML. I certainly have on Ladybrille and what I will do is refer you all to my Ghanaian-American Fashion Law Colleague who works at the Department of Labor & Employment to read how to deal with issues like these, especially for AML American entrepreneur readers. So read the excerpt on the Diddy story and then check out Ladybrille for Tracy Agyemang’s synopsis.

Diddy’s New York legal team is solid but this case may be one that is settled, if there is strong evidence that supports the intern’s version of the facts.

-Uduak

“It’s All About the Benjamins” for Sean “Diddy” Combs — but now a former intern for the rap mogul’s record label Bad Boy Entertainment also wants some of his cash money.

Rashida Salaam, 26, of Brownsville, Brooklyn filed a class-action lawsuit today in Manhattan federal court accusing the company of violating minimum-wage laws by not paying interns for work performed.

“I know that I was taken advantage of,” the unemployed City College graduate told the Post. “ “I basically wanted to take a stand for all interns who work there …You are supposed to get paid for labor that you do.”

Among the tasks that Bad Boy honchos assign to interns are getting lunch and coffee for paid staffers, answering phones, gift wrapping presents, and decorating the firm’s Broadway offices during the holidays, the suit says.

Sources said company CEO Combs, who founded Bad Boy in 1993, even had the gall to require interns – although Salaam wasn’t one of them — wrap holiday and birthday presents for his kids.

“Past interns told me that they wrapped gifts for Diddy and his kids,” Salaam confided. “… They wrapped gifts for Diddy and decorated his tree at his office. Basically, they are happy to be there. It’s a big company.”

“No one is complaining about doing the work. They think it’s going to catapult their career. “ Salaam worked as an unpaid intern from January 2012 to June 2012, typically three or four days each week until 6 pm or 7 pm, the suit says.

New York Post has the full story.

Ladybrille article
Review: “Violations En Vogue? Employment and Labor Laws Concerning Fashion Models and Interns.” by Attorney Tracy Agyemang.

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Africa Music Law™

AFRICA MUSIC LAW™ (AML) is a pioneering music business and entertainment law blog and podcast show by Fashion and Entertainment Lawyer Ms. Uduak Oduok empowering the African artist and Africa's rapidly evolving entertainment industry through brilliant music business and entertainment law commentary and analysis, industry news, and exclusive interviews.

Credited for several firsts in the fashion and entertainment industry, Ms. Uduak is also a Partner and Co-Founder of Ebitu Law Group, P.C. where she handles her law firm’s intellectual property law, media, business, fashion, and entertainment law practice areas. She has litigated a wide variety of cases in California courts and handled a variety of entertainment deals for clients in the USA, Africa, and Asia.

Her work and contributions to the creative industry have been recognized by numerous organizations including the National Bar Association, The American University School of Law and featured in prestigious legal publications in the USA including ABA Journal and The California Lawyer Magazine. She is also an Adjunct Professor at the prestigious Academy of Arts University in San Francisco.
For legal representation inquiries, please email (uduak@ebitulawgrp.com). For blog related inquiries i.e. advertising, licensing, or guest interview requests, please email (africamusiclaw@gmail.com). Thank you for visiting Africa Music Law™.

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