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NBC Bans D’Banj-Don Jazzy “Big Yansh” Oliver Twist Song, Let’s Have a Debate About Use of the Word “Yansh”

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Do you all know how much I was told that I was a very beautiful girl, growing up in Nigeria, but what I lacked was a “big yansh” and a “thick plump” figure  to be considered truly desired girl by boys and ultimately men? Don’t ask me why people even thought to say that to a young girl. *Rolls eyes.* That is Naija (Nigeria) for you.  But, what is SHOCKING is, since my last visit to Nigeria, it appears the use of the word “yansh” or any derivative form i.e. “big yansh” is inappropriate?

Should I be happy? All those girls that acted like they were a lot prettier than me because of their highly favored well endowed gluteus maximus (big yansh), is this karma? You know what they say about karma. LOL!

On a more serious note, let me lay a quick context and then let’s have a debate about the use of the word “yansh.”

One of the many languages spoken in Nigeria, as we all know, is Pidgin English. When spoken in its true form, “yansh” means buttocks.

For example, “see as e come carry im yansh go enter wahala.” Translated to mean, “see how she/he carries his/her butt to walk into trouble.”

“That girl get big yansh o!” That lady is so big, she has a large butt. In the context used, it could be a man admiring the woman with the big”yansh” or a man/woman making fun of the girl with the big butt.

Nigerian men for the longest time loved a woman with big “yansh.” It is what long legged skinny girls like myself where tortured with, growing up, as referenced above. Thank God I didn’t cave in. “Big yansh” for me? Lai, lai! (Never. I’ll pass.)

In any event, D’Banj sings a song called ‘Oliver Twist’ and sets up a competition along with Don Jazzy and the Mo’Hits crew. In the song, he references the following line, “I have a confession don’t take it personal . . . see I like Beyonce but she dey with Jigga .” . .then he names a few other Nigerian celebrities  and drops “big yansh” in the song. Beyond the scope of using “big yansh” there seems to be no other issues.

Allegedly, the  National Broadcasting Commission (NBC) which regulates the broadcasting industry in Nigeria has banned the song, per news circulating online today. The song is allegedly saidd  to contain “lewd” lyrics. Did I miss something? What is “lewd” about the word “yansh?” Does the entire song contain something else I am missing?

By the way, the media outlets reporting that the alleged ban is as a result of D’Banj saying “Omotola has big yansh,” kai! You guys are so wrong for that. If you want to write your own report that “Omotola has big yansh” as you have, do so. But stop saying D’Banj sang this. This is inaccurate reporting. The song does not have a reference to Omotola and “yansh” in the same sentence. D’Banj says he likes Nikki (Minaj) because she has a big “yansh (butt). ” Obviously there is a sexual reference but is D’Banj singing “show me the koko” worse than “yansh?” Is there anything to even be “yanshing” about on this topic? This seems silly to me.

“I have a confession
Don’t take it personal
I have a confession so you got to listen
I have a confession
Don’t take it personal
See I like Beyonce, but she dey with Jigga
I like Nikki, her yansh is bigger
I like Rihanna, she dey make me day go gaga
I like Omotola cos people like her
I like Genevieve cos I think that she’s so sweet
And Nadia Buhari
Cos she no dey drink garri
It’s not her fault you know
You cannot blame me though
I wanna have them all
I know it but the truth is that” – FreeNaijaLyrics.com

The only persons that could seem to have anything to be worked up about is Nikki Minaj who can now sue KANYE WEST’s GOOD Music for allowing D’Banj, his artist, to use her name without consent and for commercial gain. WELCOME TO AMERICA PEOPLE. On the American end, we see this in a recent suit with Lindsay Lohan who sued Pitbull for using her name in a song. The Lohan case and my analysis is too sweet, I think, to spoil it for you all here. So, if you are interested, read it here.

What do you all think about the alleged ban? Does anyone know the criteria NBC uses to determine what is “lewd?” If so, please do share.

What is wrong with the word “yansh?” Am I missing something? Does the word “Oliver twist” have a coded sexually explicit meaning to it? I am quite confused on this alleged ban.

Let me know in your comments below.

_________________________

Like Africamusiclaw on Facebook, follow me on twitter @africamusiclaw @uduaklaw

Cheers,

Uduak

See the song and video in question.

My favorite Oliver Twist so far

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Africa Music Law™

AFRICA MUSIC LAW™ (AML) is a pioneering music business and entertainment law blog and podcast show by Fashion and Entertainment Lawyer Ms. Uduak Oduok empowering the African artist and Africa's rapidly evolving entertainment industry through brilliant music business and entertainment law commentary and analysis, industry news, and exclusive interviews.

Credited for several firsts in the fashion and entertainment industry, Ms. Uduak is also a Partner and Co-Founder of Ebitu Law Group, P.C. where she handles her law firm’s intellectual property law, media, business, fashion, and entertainment law practice areas. She has litigated a wide variety of cases in California courts and handled a variety of entertainment deals for clients in the USA, Africa, and Asia.

Her work and contributions to the creative industry have been recognized by numerous organizations including the National Bar Association, The American University School of Law and featured in prestigious legal publications in the USA including ABA Journal and The California Lawyer Magazine. She is also an Adjunct Professor at the prestigious Academy of Arts University in San Francisco.
For legal representation inquiries, please email (uduak@ebitulawgrp.com). For blog related inquiries i.e. advertising, licensing, or guest interview requests, please email (africamusiclaw@gmail.com). Thank you for visiting Africa Music Law™.

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1 Comment

  1. dele femi says:

    we should realise that whatever we sing today will reflect in the next generation. If we are comfortable having to watch our kids abuse every dignity of morality, then lets flow.

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