Film Business, Music Business

Video: Nigeria’s Entertainment Industry, a Call for Focus and Innovation

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Don JazzyHighlights:

1. Reduce the number of international artists performing in Nigeria.

2. Producers should receive credit for their work.

3. Changes need to happen in music publishing, and distribution.

4. A more structured industry is necessary.

5. Nigeria’s entertainment industry cannot sustain itself so technically it is not an industry.

-Uduak

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Africa Music Law™

AFRICA MUSIC LAW™ (AML) is a pioneering music business and entertainment law website and podcast show empowering the African artist and Africa's rapidly evolving entertainment industry through brilliant music business and entertainment law commentary and analysis, industry news, and exclusive interviews.

For general inquiries, advertising, licensing, or to appear on the show as a guest, please email (info@africamusiclaw.com). Thank you for visiting.

ABOUT THE FOUNDER

Credited for several firsts in the fashion and entertainment industry, Uduak Oduok (Ms. Uduak) is a fashion and entertainment lawyer, speaker, visionary, gamechanger, trailblazer, and recognized thought leader, for her work on Africa’s emerging global fashion and entertainment markets, and the niche practice of fashion law in the United States. She is also the founder of ‘Africa Music Law,’ an industry go-to music business and law blog and podcast show empowering African artists. Her work in the creative and legal industries has earned her numerous awards and recognitions, including an award from the American University Washington College of Law for her “legal impact in the field of intellectual property in Africa." She has also taught as an Adjunct Professor at several institutions in the United States. For more information, visit her at https://msuduak.com.

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1 Comment

  1. Winston Balagare says:

    Thanks for pointing out these important things, Ms. Oduok. It's very important that this latest generation of African musicians is not taken advantage of.

    One thing I would like to see addressed on your site is the need for African musicians to protect their art online. There isn't much that can be done about bootleggers who traffic in physical copies of pirated material. However, online, through US-based merchants like iTunes and Amazon, there is a growing problem of outside parties selling the music of African artists as "compilation" albums. Music that has been uploaded by musicians for their fans to download for free is being sold for profit. Just imagine the hundreds of thousands of dollars that have been lost already by this unscrupulous practice. This is the precise reason why African musicians need legal experts, like yourself, to advise them on how they can protect themselves and take back ownership of the artistry in which they have invested blood, sweat, tears, money, and time.

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